REAL PEOPLE providing REAL SOLUTIONS with REAL VALUE

Summer will be here before you know it, and with it comes vacation and travel. However, if you take prescription medications on a daily basis this can be a bit of a challenge. So, let’s spend a few moments and talk about traveling with your medication. After all, if your luggage is lost, so is your medicine. Plus, there are several other things you need to be mindful of as well.  more

It’s no secret, most lactation experts encourage breast feeding for mothers, particularly if they are physically able. The reason? Simply put, a mother’s milk is like super food for an infant. Breast milk contains proteins, antioxidants and a host of other beneficial health ingredients that are super easy for babies to process.  more

When excess uric acid builds up in the body it can cause swelling or pain in the joints of your feet. This medical condition is known as gout (typically affecting middle aged to elderly individuals), and it is sometimes nasty. Gout pain can make your feet feel as if they are on fire. The attacks are intense and can manifest at the most inopportune times. more

Thousands of children in the United States are diagnosed with autism, also known as Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD). As such, these children can have very specific sensory processing issues/preferences which makes daily life more difficult than it is for the average person. For instance, certain textures might bother them, colors or tones, maybe they have a preference for certain tastes, or avoid things altogether if they are perceived as extremely uncomfortable.  more

As our bodies age, it may become necessary to be on more than one medication. It’s a complicated matter though. People over 55 may develop sensitivity to certain additives or preservatives used to produce their prescription medicine. In addition, they may have trouble swallowing pills or have a hard time keeping track of the sheer number they are required to take. Compounded medication can provide a benefit.  more

It usually begins with a problem of some sort. For instance, a child can’t take a medicine because it’s too bitter. Maybe a patient has trouble swallowing a pill, or a particular strength that the doctor prescribes is not available commercially. This is where compounding enters the equation. more

Today’s pharmacist primarily serves behind the scenes, as the supplier of prescription-only medications at a doctor’s request. This role was established in the early half of the twentieth century, with a boom in pre-manufactured medications and the creation of prescription-only drugs in 1951. But this was not always the case: throughout the nineteenth century druggists and apothecaries (the predecessors of today’s pharmacist) were an irreplaceable part of health care, offering custom-made medications and medical advice and consultations. more